Have you ever imagined leaving your 9-to-5 job behind? Irishman Johnny Ward did, and has just finished a 10-year goal to go to every nation in the world, a journey which has actually seen him check out 197 countries, ending in Norway previously this month, where he commemorated the accomplishment with his sweetheart and family. However it wasn’t all champagne popping; along the path, Ward came across corrupt border representatives, travelled throughout battle zones and spent nights in authorities’ custody and health center beds. He saw a male shot in front of him in Angola and heard bombs in Mogadishu, Somalia. It wasn’t a whistlestop trip, either. The tourist made sure to spend a number of days, and often a couple of weeks, in each location.

The 33-year-old is eager to stress that he’s not “simply another white person from an abundant household, circumnavigating on daddy’s charge card”. Certainly, he was raised by a single mom in Galway and after that in County Down, Northern Ireland, and his household often had a hard time for cash. He at first funded his trips by teaching English as a year 9 tutor, prior to going on to begin a travel blog site, which broadened into a media brand name incorporating more than 100 different sites. The explorer states he has made over $US1 million ($A1.33 million) from marketing profits on his sites, purchased property in London and Bangkok, and will never ever have to work a workplace job again. On his site, One Action 4 Ward, he narrates his journeys as well as uses recommendations to those wanting to imitate him with a similar opportunity in the software and digital transformation age.

We managed to pin Johnny down for a couple of minutes to ask some questions about his amazing experience, including the most remarkable minutes from his journeys, and whether he actually believes his way of life is possible for anybody.

Where did this desire to take a trip originated from?

It’s the flexibility – travel is a sign of that. Growing up poor, without a father, meant I disliked being stuck and authority was a battle for me. I attempted to create a life where I might make the choices I wanted, not based upon some grey middle supervisor who authorizes vacation leave, and not based upon monetary restraints.

Tell us the story behind your very first journey

I had been dealing with a summertime camp for disadvantaged kids in New York City all summer season, then travelled around the United States, so I returned to Ireland broke. I was desperate to take a trip but my mum could not fund a gap year for me, so I needed to do it myself. I needed a few grand to spend for an English mentor certification, and my flights to Asia so I registered for medical research study, where you lock yourself in a healthcare facility and they trial drugs on you before they can launch them to the basic population. I did 5 weeks – you’re not allowed out and cannot have visitors – but it set me up, and within a number of months I was residing in Thailand, working as an English tutor – so it was all worth it.

You’re extremely open on your site about having actually generated income from your journeys. How did you do it? And can anybody do the very same?

I have always been quite open about money things, I do not understand why individuals are so protected about it. When I began blogging, I was broke, and I was really open about that too, so now I have actually managed to make money from blogging, I’m similarly open from the opposite! I have needed to be diligent enough to take out my laptop computer, accurately mobile data capture the latest facts and news about my journeys, and work in the nights when I remained in Mongolia, or Kazakhstan, or Ethiopia. Those were the bumpy rides, putting the work in while I was actively taking a trip, not knowing if it would settle or not. I began contracting out great deals of the work which was crucial I believe. Anybody can do it – as long as they want to put the rest of their life on hold and concentrate on blogging, it’s 100 percent possible.

Do you believe that more individuals will embrace this sort of remote working way of life as time goes on?

I believe so. Individuals are beginning to understand that to be a reliable, effective, happy staff member, you need not be determined by the hours you put in, but by your output. That shift alone will permit more remote working. Life isn’t really meant to be kept in a cubicle. It’s so short, we have to make sure we make the most of it. Working from another country plays a huge part in that.

Exactly what would you advise somebody preparing to set out on a journey of a life time?

Forget the media’s interpretation of nations, they’re wrong. Forget individuals telling you to concentrate on your profession, they missed their possibility, do not miss yours. Remember you’re never ever prepared, you’ll never ever have enough money, and you’ll never ever be brave enough, yet here you are and you’re ready to go.

Written by 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *